Pictures of MÁV Class V40 "Kandó" Electric Loco


Ganz Loco for the Valtellina line minipic The first 3-phase dual catenary locomotive Ganz delivered to the Italian Valtellina line in 1902. The shape and dual cab structure was copied from the American B&O electric locomotive. This loco has direct drive wheelsets - like the B&O one too.
Ganz Loco for the Valtellina line minipic The same locomotive today, in the "Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Technology" in Milan. The engine is in quite good shape, but probably without machinery. The manufacturer's plates are missing, probably removed during the WW1, when Hungary and Italy were enemies.
Ganz Electric railcar for the Valtellina line minipic The Ganz 3-phase electric railcar delivered for the Valtellina line.
Ganz Loco for the Valtellina line minipic The last locomotive Ganz delivered for the Valtellina line, and the last one for long time Ganz manufactured at all. As the Valtellina electrification was unsuccessful as business, Ganz managers decided to fully withdraw from railway electrification. This locomotive is the first showing Mr. Kandó's invention, the slot drive. The two traction motors drive a horizontal rod, that is equipped with a vertical slot, allowing the driver's crankpin to move vertically. Later the Swiss manufacturer SLM purchased the licence of this drive and produced many locomotives using this solution, mainly for the Swiss narrow gauge lines.
3-phase "Cinquanta" loco minipic The "Cinquanta", E555, Mr. Kandó designed in 1905 as chief engineer of the "Italian Westinghouse Locomotive Company" for the famous Giovi line near Genova. The rod drive is similar to the former locomotive. The "Cinquantas" were used long time in Italy, well in the '60s.
3-phase "Cinquanta" loco minipic One "Cinquanta" today in the "Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Technology" in Milan.
Italian 3-phase "Trenta" loco minipic The "Trenta" 1-C-1 passenger 3-phase electric loco for the Italian lines. At the time of its construction, this engine had the highest power to weight ratio in the world.
Phase splitter of the Austrian engine minipic The phase splitter machine of the Austrian engines. As constructed for 16Hz, its size is considerably larger than those of the 50Hz locomotives' phase splitter. Due to its large size the stator is cooled by air, not by putting into oil bath. This caused its failure in the wet air of the Arlberg tunnel.
Ganz 1st experimental converter loco minipic The first experimental phase converter locomotive, built in 1924. Mr Kandó learned from the problems of the Italian 3-phase electrification, and promoted the single phase industrial frequency (50Hz) electrification in Hungary. This was the first locomotive using the phase converter technology. This also used Mr. Kandó's new invention, the "Kandó-triangle" that replaced the maintenance-hungry slot drive.
Ganz 2nd experimental converter loco minipic The second experimental locomotive, built in 1926 on the frame of the first one - but in opposite direction: look at the opposite placement of the triangle. This version had a 4-pole phase converter, that rotated only 1500RPM, instead of the 3000RPM of the former model. This model is already equipped with conventional pantographs. The loco became later MÁV Class V50, but it was scrapped in 1936, when already enough V40s were available.
Experimental loco phase splitter minipic The phase splitter of the experimental loco inside the cooling oil bath. Compare the size of this 50Hz machine with those of the Austrian 16Hz one.
Final Kando loco phase splitter minipic The phase splitter of the final Kandó loco without oil tank.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco minipic Kandó's mainline phase converter loco, the V40. 22 of them were built. They operated until 1970. These engines used 16kV 50Hz catenary. As the Budapest-Hegyeshalom line was rebuilt with 25kV since, the Kandó locos cannot operate anywhere in Hungary.
MÁV Class V60 Kandó loco minipic The freight version, the V60. Only 3 of them were built as the V40s performed well for freight trains.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco drivers minipic The V40's rod drive. the locos have one large, 10' diameter 48 pole asynchronous multiphase traction motors in the center. This drives the wheels through the slanted main rod. The other slanted rod goes to the auxiliary shaft, that forwards the main rod force's vertical component to the opposite side as horizontal component.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco side minipic The cab side of the V40. Below the cab there is the auxiliary air reservoir.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco side minipic The other side. below the main air reservoir. You can see the large main traction motor through the window.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco front minipic The other front. The sun shade around the windows was not available on the first engines, but gave a very characteristic appearance for the Kandó locos.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco front minipic Front view. The headlights weren't integrated first, they were plugged on, like on the steam locos. The footplate is necessary to clean the windows. The ladder serves for climbing on the roof.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco front minipic The other front. The main air reservoir is large, hard to model.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco leading wheel minipic Below the cab. The pot on the left side is the brake cylinder. It is mounted vertically, and pulls the brake rigging through a bell crank.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco leading wheel minipic The opposite side, with the auxiliary air reservoir.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco drivers minipic The drivers. In the center the rotating small rod is  part of the lubrication system.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco roof minipic The roof. The radiator on the top of the large diameter traction motor is well visible.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco roof minipic The other side. On the left side the small lever is a switch, that shorts the overhead system to the earth, when the roof ladder will be opened. This is the security mechanism to avoid the driver to climb up until the loco is connected to the 16kV supply.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco roof minipic The other end of the roof.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco roof minipic A better view on the roof. The white projection behind the pantograph is the fan on the top of the phase converter. The phase converter had a separate cooling system.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco roof minipic The other roof end. The "stack" is where the steam of the fluid resistor escapes. On the right side the main switch is well visible. It was operated by a simple isolated rod from the cab.
MÁV Class V40 Kandó loco cab interior minipic The cab inside. That time everything was made from nice brass castings. The phase converter loco was rather hard to drive due to the rigid synchronization steps. Between the steps an automatic equipment filled the fluid resistor according the traction motor's power.
MÁV Class V44 loco minipic The successor of the V40, the V44. It had not only phase converter, but a frequency converter too. The wheelsets were driven by simple three phase traction motors and Sècheron-drive. Two of these engines were built in 1944, but they were destroyed during the bombardments of Budapest.
MAV retired Class V55 converter engineThe after WW2 converter engine, the Class V55. It had a modern truck-drive with nose suspended 3-phase induction motors. The axle arrangement is rather unusual, BoCo, with one four-wheel truck and one six-wheel one. This was necessary to limit the axle load resulted by the heavy phase splitter and frequency converter machines. For the same reason the body was built with a "monocoque" construction, one of the first of this principles in Europe. 20 of these machines were built, including the two prototypes, that have different appearance, with three front windows and a center door on the front. Due to the poor quality materials that were available in Hungary in the early '50s, they were rather unreliable machines.
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This page was updated last time on 13th February 1999
© János Erö